Leftover Hard Boiled Easter Eggs Go To the Dogs, Cats

Hard boiled Easter eggs
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If you have lots of leftover hard boiled Easter eggs and you’re looking for alternatives to egg salad or deviled eggs, then let those eggs go to the dogs and cats. Eggs are a good source of protein, and also a common ingredient in homemade dog food and an occasional addition for cat food.

Share Easter with your dogs and cats

Like leftover Thanksgiving turkey, leftover Easter eggs present a dilemma every year for many families. In fact, hard boiled eggs present a greater challenge than turkey, because it seems there are fewer reasonable recipes available to use up the eggs.

If you have dogs or cats, those extra hard boiled eggs could supplement their regular diet. If you are feeling more creative, some of those eggs would be a welcome protein-rich ingredient in homemade dog food.

Cats should generally not eat more than the equivalent of one egg every two to three days, so unless you have several cats, you won’t use up many extra hard boiled eggs as cat food.

Before you give your dogs or cats hard boiled eggs or make any change in their diet, it is generally recommended you talk to your veterinarian and make food changes gradually so as not to upset your pet’s digestion.

Recipe with hard boiled eggs for dogs
Here is a recipe for home made food for adult dogs that includes hard boiled eggs. It is a variation of a recipe from Shawn Messonnier, DVM, from 8 Weeks to a Healthy Dog. This recipe meets the daily nutritional requirements for a 25- to 35-pound adult dog and can be divided into two servings per day.

  • 3 hard boiled eggs
  • 2 cups cooked brown rice
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • One to 1 ½ teaspoons bonemeal powder
  • ½ to 1 cup fresh or slightly steamed carrots

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Mash the eggs and mix well with all the other ingredients.

You can also make this recipe substituting 2 cups of mashed potatoes (white or sweet, cooked with the skins) for the rice. A substitute for the hard boiled eggs can include ½ pound chicken or turkey, or 1 cup low-fat cottage cheese.

Another option is to double the entire recipe (for two days of food) and use three hard boiled eggs and another protein source, such as ½ pound chicken or salmon, cooked.

Easter egg shells
Finely ground egg shells are also a great source of calcium for dogs and cats. Calcium is often added to homemade pet foods and for pets that have been identified by a vet as needing additional calcium. However, do not give the shells to your pets unless you used natural dyes to color your eggs.

To prepare the egg shells, wash them (easier to wash them before you crack the eggs) and dry them in the oven at 300 degrees F. This not only dries the shells but also eliminates the mineral oils that are used on egg shells to prevent them from drying out in stores.

Place the shells into a blender or food processor and process until the shells are a powder. Use a sieve to remove any sharp or large pieces.

This year may be the time to share your leftover hardboiled Easter eggs with your dog or cat. So make yourself an egg salad sandwich and let the rest of the leftover hardboiled Easter eggs go to the dogs and cats.

Image: PhotosPublicDomain

Updated 10/30/2014

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Comments

"To prepare the egg shells, wash them (easier to wash them before you crack the eggs) and dry them in the oven at 300 degrees F. This not only dries the shells but also eliminates the mineral oils that are used on egg shells to prevent them from drying out in stores." Aren't you already "washing" them during the boiling/cooling (cold water) process?