Kate Middleton Considers Hypnobirthing, But What Is It?

Hypnobirthing and Kate Middleton
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Many people in the world are waiting anxiously for Princess Kate Middleton to deliver her royal child, and she reportedly has been considering hypnobirthing as the chosen method. What is hypnobirthing, is it safe, and might it spurn a growing number of pregnant women who look at this option?

Hypnobirthing may make giving birth easier

The “hypno” part of hyponobirthing refers to self-hypnosis, which indicates that women learn how to hypnotize themselves to achieve a level of relaxation that significant reduces the anxiety, fear, and pain associated with childbirth. Hypnobirthing requires some practice, so women who want to consider this delivery method should seek help during their pregnancy to learn the technique.

Giving birth is a stressful event, and it triggers the release of the fight-or-flight hormones, also known as stress hormones. Therefore, a woman who is experiencing labor and delivery has a rush of stress hormones that race to her legs, arms, heart, and brain, diverting important energy from the birthing process.

Although hypnobirthing may not be a common approach to modern labor and delivery, it has been around for centuries. However, it has only gained some recognition in contemporary society in recent years under various names, such as The Mongan Method, Hypnobabies, Hypbirth, and HypnoBirthing.

However, women who learn how to self-hypnotize and reduce their awareness of the pain and other negative aspects of childbirth can stop the release of stress hormones. In fact, according to Mongan, when women who practice self-hypnosis they replace fear with relaxation, which causes different chemicals to present themselves: prostaglandins, oxytocin, and endorphins (natural pain killers), which help reduce pain and instill a sense of calm.

In 2010, actress Tiffani Thiessen announced she would be using hypnobirthing to deliver her child, and the technique received some brief media exposure. However, many women are not aware of this technique and the advantages it may offer them.

Pregnant women who want to learn hypnobirthing should ask their healthcare provider and contact certified childbirth educators and local midwives about the process. Several organizations are available that can help you find professional midwives in your area.

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Pregnant women typically begin their training during the third trimester. Different teachers present the technique in somewhat different ways, but the basic concept is the same: the use of various techniques, such as language, music, visualization, positive thinking, to achieve a state of relaxation that helps women control pain and other stressors during labor and delivery.

More about hypnobirthing
Can pregnant women eliminate the pain of childbirth using hypnotherapy? Some do. Mostly women who use hypnotherapy experience a significant reduction in pain and anxiety and feel calmer and more in control of their situation.

Use of hypnobirthing can mean the use of little or no drugs during labor and delivery, a shorter labor, fewer complications, a calmer mother and newborn, and the possibility that posterior and breech infants can be turned using hypnosis.

Certified childbirth educators, midwives, certified hypnotherapists knowledgeable about hypnobirthing, and other professionals can help you decide whether hypnobirthing is right for you. Look for individuals who have been specifically trained in hypnobirthing.

Another option is to use a home study course or instructional videos about hypnobirthing. This approach may be the only viable option for women who do not have access to anyone who is qualified to help them with hypnotherapy. However, pregnant women who choose this option should discuss their plans with their healthcare provider.

Hypnobirthing is a technique that has been used for centuries by women, yet it has been somewhat forgotten. Now that Kate Middleton may chose this technique as her labor and delivery approach, hypnobirthing has been brought into the spotlight as an option for women who are pregnant.

SOURCE:
Granger S. Hypnotherapy for childbirth. Practical Midwife 2012 Sep; 15(8): S13-14

Image: Morguefile

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