Eyeball Licking and Other Unusual Ways To Say I Like You

Eyeball licking
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Eyeball licking is a current craze among Japanese school children and adolescents, and one associated with significant health risks, including conjunctivitis, corneal abrasions, and blindness. Although eyeball licking is an unusual way to tell someone you like them, there are other unusual ways to say I like you as well.

How do I like thee? Let me count the ways

According to various news reports, the origins of eyeball licking (also known as oculolinctus or worming) are a bit hazy. A report in the Guardian notes that the Japanese band Born has a music video scene depicting eyeball licking.

While eyeball licking is an especially unhealthy way for people to display their affection for another person, there are other options that don’t pose health risks but still get the message across, in both erotic and nonerotic ways.

  • Eyelashes. This practice involves keeping your eyes closed, thus the risk of infection or harm is eliminated. Gently brushing your tongue along a person’s eyelashes while his or her eyes are closed is a sign of affection.
  • Feet and toes: Feet and toes are especially sensitive, and massaging the feet of a partner or friend is one way to say I like you or want to help you feel better. After all, reflexology is one of the healing arts. However, if you are more intimate with someone, sucking the toes is another option (but make sure the feet are clean!)
  • Behind the knees: Women in particular are sensitive behind their knees. Men who want to let a woman know he’s interested in her can stroke her gently behind the knees.
  • Armpits: This custom is from 19th century rural Austria, but show knows—it may take off again. Single women used to place apple slices under their armpits while they danced, then offer the fruit to their partner when the dance was over. Men who ate the apple slices were said to want to do more than dance.
  • Spoons: Yes, spoons. In Wales, it has been a custom since the 17th century for couples to express their affection for one another by trading lovespoons. Some of these spoons were passed down from generation to generation and were made of wood carved and decorated. Today the tradition has largely disappeared, although lovespoons are still given on Valentine’s Day.
  • Love huts: In Cambodia, members of the Kreung tribe allow unmarried adolescent girls to explore sex and communication with various partners in a love hut. The parents believe this custom helps their daughters become empowered and gain independence while also finding their true love.
  • Celery: Among the Amish, courtships are typically secret, but busybody neighbors can tell if there’s an upcoming wedding by checking out the celery situation. When a family’s garden suddenly sprouts a lot of celery, that usually means one of the family’s daughters will be getting married, since creamed celery is an important dish at Amish wedding dinners.

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Here is one last reference to using the eyes to show affection. This one comes from the animal kingdom, or specifically the domestic cat.

When cats want to show affection and signs of being content, they slowly blink their eyes. This activity is known as kitty kisses, and it sure beats eyeball licking as a way to show someone you care.

SOURCE:
Guardian, June 14, 2013

Image: Morguefile

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