Swine flu vaccination fears put to rest

Jenny Decker RN's picture
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Wild rumors do not even come close to describing the fears circulating in emails across the country in regards to the swine flu vaccination. It is a given that there are some who do not believe in vaccinations. However, the misinformation that is literally flying around can be much more dangerous than any side effects resulting from the H1N1 shot. It is important to put swine flu vaccination fears at rest for the good of the American people.

Education is power. In the case of swine flu prevention, education may save your life. It takes only a few moments to check out the emails that exaggerate or make false claims about swine flu vaccination by going to websites such as Department of Health and Human Services Flu.gov and the CDC. Finding out the truth about “claims” may even set your anxieties at rest.

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Some of the more common fears associated with the swine flu vaccination include thimerosal, squalene, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, and some concerns that the government is planning a “depopulation” event, writes Newsweek. The first fear is that thimerosal causes developmental disorders in children, such as autism. Thimerosal has been studied in several research trials and there is no connection between thimerosal and autism. Interestingly, thimerosal was originally added to vaccinations to prevent them from becoming tainted.

Squalene is a vaccine adjuvant that is actually used in Europe, and there have been no side effects from the millions who have received any vaccinations containing it. However, it has not been approved for use in the United States. The concern with squalene begins with a report that came out in 2000 showing that squalene caused autoimmune diseases such as lupus, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. The article also stated that squalene caused Gulf War syndrome. The problem with the study is that there was no squalene in the vaccinations at all. The study was skewed because there was no scientific rigor to support any findings.

Another type of email that has been going around includes the fears of Guillain-Barre syndrome. Back in 1975, over 30 years ago, a small percentage of people who received flu shots developed a type of paralysis, known as Guillain-Barre Syndrome. The CDC investigated this and found that the risk from Guillain-Barre syndrome was much less than the risk for contracting and developing the flu with its associated complications. It is recommended by the CDC, however, that persons who have already contracted GBS not get the H1N1 vaccination.

An email that went out recently talks about the government and their plans to “depopulate” the country. This is what the email states, according to Newsweek, “their evil depopulation plan is in full swing! Do the right thing…get this story out. The seasonal flu shot also contains H1N1 and H3N2 and one other deadly flu. Do not take any vaccine. none... none... none.” Rest assured that the vaccination is a dead virus that is floated in a salt solution that is the same salt we each have in our body fluids. The government is making the vaccination to protect Americans, not to depopulate. This is an unfounded fear. This can be checked out by visiting the Department of Health and Human Services Flu.gov website, the CDC website, and also the inserts for the vaccinations. Fears about the swine flu vaccination should also be discussed with your doctor.

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Comments

Our family has been going back and forth for several months now on whether or not we wanted to get the vaccine for our kids. You are right, there is a ton of info circulating which just adds to the confusion. Our family is really trying to take the preventative route right now with lots of hand washing, hand sanitizer and taking our daily Vidazorb probiotics! We just really want to keep the bad bugs away and replenish our good ones.