Wisconsin family wants special street signs for autistic child

Lana Bandoim's picture

A family in Wisconsin wants special street signs for their autistic child, but the Autism Society of Southeast Wisconsin is not supporting them. The society believes the signs may actually lead to more problems and does not want them installed. The Krencisz family is asking the city of Racine to warn drivers that a child with autism lives on their street.

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The Krencisz family believes their 5-year-old autistic son is a run-away risk based on his past behavior. Markus Krencisz has run directly into traffic on multiple occasions, and his mother indicates that yelling for him to stop produces no response. He does not understand the dangers around him, so they believe street signs can help by alerting drivers to his presence.

Street signs for autism have been used in other parts of Wisconsin, and the family believes they will be successful on their street. They are worried that cars drive too quickly in their area and hope the signs will help protect their son. However, the Autism Society of Southeast Wisconsin has a different view of autism-specific street signs and believes they may attract predators. The society points out that the family will be letting the entire world know their child has autism while giving away his location, so he could become a target.

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The Krencisz family is not worried about predators seeking out their autistic child. Instead, they are more concerned about him running into traffic and being killed by a car. This is a common cause of anxiety for many families of autistic children because they do not understand traffic laws and do not pay attention to the dangers around them. Racine’s Traffic Commission has to approve the sign request, but insiders claim it will not be hard to get the support.

Read more about autism:
Airlines provide autism support: Advice for flying
Family being deported because of autistic child: Maria Sevilla reveals details

Image: Derrick Coetzee/Wikimedia Commons

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