New fibromyalgia medication gives patients hope in clinical trials

Lana Bandoim's picture

A new fibromyalgia medication is giving patients hope in clinical trials. Researchers provided an update on the study at the American College of Rheumatology annual meeting and revealed that their investigation is not over, but the IMC-1 drug is already showing promise. This oral medication is being examined in a randomized, double-blind study that hopes to uncover a link between fibromyalgia and tissue-resident herpes virus.

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Researchers believe that the combination of an anti-herpes virus drug with other medications may be the key to fighting fibromyalgia. They are conducting the study at several different clinics around the United States over the course of 16 weeks. They estimate that the clinical trial should be over by next March, but they have already collected data from the patients.

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The IMC-1 drug performed better than a placebo in the study with patients continuing the therapy instead of neglecting it. They also reported lower pain levels on the special rating scale for people who used the drug. Moreover, side effects appeared to be limited and did not discourage patients from taking the medication. Researchers see multiple positive aspects to the drug and hope it can bring relief to millions of patients. Although IMC-1 is not available by prescription while it is being tested, it should be on the market in the future once final approval is granted.

This is not the first study to suggest that herpes may play a role in fibromyalgia. Previous reports have indicated that some patients felt better after taking drugs meant to treat herpes simplex virus type one (HSV-1). Patients who had fibromyalgia and took the antiviral drugs mentioned that their pain decreased and energy increased. There are several ongoing studies trying to address the connection between the virus and the disorder.

Read more about fibromyalgia:
Memantine drug shows promise for fibromyalgia
Fibromyalgia study focuses on brain stimulation to fight pain

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