Menopause causes confusion with celiac disease

Lana Bandoim's picture

A recent report suggests that there may be some confusion between the symptoms of menopause and celiac disease because of overlap. Previous research has indicated that it is possible to have both conditions begin at the same time, so it is important for patients to ask questions. Women should not ignore any of their symptoms while they seek medical help.

Advertisement

Dr. William Outlaw recently addressed the issues of menopause and celiac disease on Fox8. He mentioned that the symptoms of joint paint, fatigue, brain fog and others can be seen in both conditions, so it is easy to see why patients may feel confused. He believes that testing for celiac disease is the right step to eliminate the possibility of having this disorder.

The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center has previously suggested that it is possible for menopause to trigger celiac disease. Researchers have shown that stress is an issue and connected to multiple disorders, so the connection between the two conditions appears to exist. This may also explain why there is overlap in some of the symptoms people generally experience.

Advertisement

Questions about fertility and celiac disease are common among women who have this disorder. A study from the journal Menopause reveals that women with celiac disease are more likely to have menopause start earlier. However, this is directly related to their diagnosis and how they handle the condition. Researchers noticed that the women who received treatment and stayed on a gluten-free diet did not have earlier menopause.

Scientists suggest that the key to avoiding fertility problems for women with celiac disease may be to receive treatment and avoid gluten. Women who may not realize they have the disorder or ignore the advice of their doctors are more likely to experience problems, and researchers observed their menopause symptoms tend to be worse.

Read more about celiac disease:
Federal school lunch program concerns for celiac disease
Avoiding gluten cross-contamination for celiac disease

Image: Elmo Love/Wikimedia Commons

Share this content.

If you liked this article and think it may help your friends, consider sharing or tweeting it to your followers.
Advertisement