Gwyneth Paltrow makes hairstylist go gluten-free without celiac disease

Lana Bandoim's picture

Gwyneth Paltrow has reignited the debates about celebrities promoting diets and creating fads. She recently helped her hairstylist, David Babaii, lose 135 pounds by encouraging him to change to a gluten-free diet despite the fact that he does not have celiac disease. Although Babaii is thrilled with the results, he admits it was not easy.

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People with celiac disease must stick to a gluten-free diet for health reasons, but others who do not have this disorder are free to experiment with their food. The gluten-free diet has been used by some people to try to lose weight as part of a trend. Although results vary greatly, and people can actually gain weight while eliminating gluten, hairstylist David Babaii found success.

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David Babaii states that Gwyneth Paltrow outlined his diet plan and encouraged him throughout the process. She told him to cut out all gluten, but this was not the only change he made. He started to exercise, got a personal trainer and focused on losing weight. He also had the advantage of being able to call the celebrity at night to ask for advice about his meal choices.

Paltrow frequently promotes cutting out gluten from people’s diets, and she has her own detox plan that is even stricter. This diet plan cuts out all gluten, sugar, dairy, corn, nightshades and soy. David Babaii managed to lose 135 pounds and leave his 285-pound clothes behind. Although Gwyneth Paltrow’s suggestions helped him, it is important to remember that some people who cut out gluten do not experience weight loss. Instead, they actually gain weight because they are replacing food items with high calorie and high carbohydrates versions. Celebrities will always affect diet trends while trying to promote their own ideas. This is why you should turn to medical professionals for advice instead of trusting an actor.

Read more about celiac disease:
Dietitian offers gluten-free diet advice for celiac disease
Celiac disease group accused of manipulating gluten-free standards

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