Gluten face in celiac disease cases: Celebrity face readings

Lana Bandoim's picture

Dr. Nigma Talib claims she can identify diet problems by simply looking at a person’s face. At a recent event filled with celebrities, she was able to spot issues such as celiac disease by examining the face. Dr. Talib explains that dietary changes can have a great influence on external appearance.

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Dr. Nigma Talib believes that some of the aging people notice on their face is directly related to their diet and lifestyle. Moreover, digestive problems can be represented by several common conditions. Dr. Talib focuses on naturopathic medicine to help her patients and uses complementary treatments. She has noticed that people with celiac disease often have puffy faces because of general bloating. She also mentions that dairy face is identified by bloating, but it comes with dark circles.

Examining the face is only the first step in treating a health problem, and Dr. Nigma Talib usually orders several tests before giving a diagnosis. During a recent makeup launch party, she offered face readings to celebrities and noticed they suffered from the same issues as everyone else. In addition to diet, stress has a strong impact on how the skin ages.

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Dr. Talib advocates for a gluten-free diet that avoids processed carbohydrates to limit inflammation and aging. A poor diet is visible through acne, blemishes, dry skin or wrinkles. She encourages her patients to consume nourishing foods by focusing on fruits, vegetables and spices. Some people may also benefit from using antioxidants, vitamins and supplements, but you should discuss any changes with your doctor.

Gluten face is real, and it even affects celebrities. The protein is capable of causing bloating in the body that spreads to the face and results in puffy features. Unfortunately, the only way to fight it is through a gluten-free diet that avoids the protein completely.

Read more about celiac disease:
Gluten-free gift ideas for celiac disease sufferers
Researchers work on new celiac disease medications

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