Fibromyalgia support groups offer hope

Lana Bandoim's picture

Fibromyalgia support groups offer a valuable resource for patients who are coping with the disease. They can be found in locations ranging from local libraries to the smartphone in your hands. Although physical groups are still a popular option, the Internet has made online groups an easy alternative.

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Donald Powell-Brown has fibromyalgia and recently shared his experience with the Burton Fibromyalgia Support Group in the United Kingdom. Located at the Burton Library, the group’s meetings are scheduled once a month and provide a way to escape the isolation of the disease. Donald Powell-Brown mentions the group shares ideas and provides support for members.

Many hospitals and libraries have fibromyalgia support groups, but they are not the only places to find help. You can search for U.S. groups online and narrow down the location by your zip code or state. You can also search for U.K. groups by using the ME Association website. Each location has a list of contacts and general meeting information.

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Online support groups for fibromyalgia are growing, and it is easy to get lost among the links while doing a search for the best ones. You may want to consider the ME-CFS Community that offers a forum and a members-only area. You can also find forums at ProHealth, Patient.co.uk, DailyStrength, MDJunction and other websites.

Social media offers another source of support for people who are suffering from fibromyalgia. The Facebook pages of the National Fibromyalgia Association, National Fibromyalgia & Chronic Pain Association, FibroCenter, Fibromyalgia Network, American Chronic Pain Association and Fibromyalgia Awareness offer resources, support and links. Private Facebook groups are another option to consider, and you can always form your own group. Twitter, Pinterest and other social media networks also have resources that may help you.

Read more about fibromyalgia:
Memantine drug shows promise for fibromyalgia
Fibromyalgia study focuses on brain stimulation to fight pain

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