Fibromyalgia controversy linked to guaifenesin protocol: Can a cough syrup ingredient help?

Lana Bandoim's picture
Fibromyalgia medication

The fibromyalgia controversy involving the guaifenesin protocol has returned. A new documentary film featuring success stories from patients who followed the protocol is raising questions about the common cough syrup ingredient. Dr. R. Paul St. Amand’s idea to use guaifenesin to reduce pain remains divisive.

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Guaifenesin is easy to find at any drugstore by looking at the cough syrup ingredients on the labels. This expectorant is used to help patients remove mucus and fight congestion. Dr. R. Paul St. Amand created the guaifenesin protocol that includes taking the medication and removing all salicylates from the person’s lifestyle. In addition, patients are advised to change to a low-carbohydrate diet. Dr. Amand has claimed that the protocol is able to cure fibromyalgia and reduce pain symptoms.

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The protocol is addressed in the “Fibromyalgia: Getting Our Lives Back - Success Stories on the Guaifenesin Protocol” documentary, and it has raised questions about the use of the medication to treat the condition. A previous report examined Dr. R. Paul St. Amand’s protocol in a randomized, double-blind study for 12 months by comparing the use of guaifenesin to a placebo to help fibromyalgia patients. Dr. Robert Bennett revealed that the medication (1200 mgs of guaifenesin a day) performed in a similar manner to the placebo consisting of sugar pills. In addition, the study found that guaifenesin did not help with the excretion of phosphate or uric acid.

The common cough syrup ingredient continues to be debated online as a potential treatment option for fibromyalgia. It is important to note that some patients experienced less pain by simply taking the placebo in the study from Dr. Robert Bennett. This is another example of the power of the mind that is often documented by researchers.

Read more about fibromyalgia:
Memantine drug shows promise for fibromyalgia
Fibromyalgia study focuses on brain stimulation to fight pain

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