Celiac disease medical future hinges on understanding gluten

Lana Bandoim's picture

The future of celiac disease is not easy to predict, but doctors believe new research offers hope. Dr. Alessio Fasano remains optimistic about the possibility of learning more about the disorder and gluten. There are ongoing studies that may increase our understanding while offering new treatment options.

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Dr. Alessio Fasano, the director of the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital, believes more research about the gluten-free diet will reveal who should and should not use it. He points out that people with celiac disease are not the only ones who are using the diet, and it has become a fad. He is also optimistic about data from the Celiac Disease Genome Environmental Microbiome and Metabolic Study providing important answers.

The Celiac Disease Genome Environmental Microbiome and Metabolic Study is following 500 babies to determine when, why and how they develop autoimmune disorders. Dr. Fasano states these babies are at risk of developing celiac disease, so following their health patterns and reactions to gluten could expand researchers’ understanding of the condition. The data will take years to collect and analyze, but it offers an important way to discover more information about the disease.

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Dr. Alessio Fasano shares that genes also play a role in celiac disease, but not everyone who you would expect to have the disorder actually gets sick. He believes gut bacteria may be part of the equation, so people with well-balanced gut microbiomes are less likely to have problems. Furthermore, the role of stomach acid should not be ignored in maintaining a healthy digestive system, and more research about gluten will help.

Dr. Fasano also addresses why celiac disease and gluten sensitivity cases appear to be increasing in recent years. He believes there are two reasons behind this increase. First, more awareness about the disease is contributing to more people seeking a diagnosis. Second, he thinks there is an epidemic of autoimmune diseases, and celiac disease is one of them.

Read more about celiac disease:
Doctors ignore proper celiac disease diagnosis and care
Celiac disease tripled in children in last 20 years

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Comments

why do the celiac experts continue to ignore "ground zero " for Celiac Disease ? Norman Borlaug & his bioengineered Modern Wheat. It's pretty simple - prior to Borlaug's experiments with wheat, celiac disease was rare ( one in 3000). After his experiments (after WWII ) & the distribution of his new wheat seed, cases of celiac disease started popping up in the 1950s. A solution is clear - if we go back to Heirloom Wheat strains, cases of CD will drop back to one in 3000.
I am with you Darlene. What can we do to force this issue and go back to pre-1950's wheat? Obviously the government doesn't care about the general population who are continuing to become ill because of bioengineering our foods. We don't want to be experimented on anymore.
I totally agree with you! Wheat today is not the wheat of the 40s and the early 50s. It looks different, it has a smell, and I for one do not understand why it seems to be impossible for scientists and physicians to acknowledge that a different plant can cause illness.
Can you give some advise or proper places to find answers......IS THERE ANY CONNECTION BETWEEN CELIAC DISEASE AND PSORISIAS SKIN DISEASE ? TWO MEMBERS OF FAMILY HAVE ONE WITH CELIAC ONE WITH VERY SERIOUS PSORIAIAS.
I have a close friend whose mother has been diagnosed with celiac disease. My friend has psoriasis. She has found her psoriasis waxes and wanes with hoe much gluten she consumes.
Bev: are you sure your relatives don't have dermatitis herpetiformis? That is the skin manifestation of celiac disease. If they haven't talked to their doctors about this, they should.