Burger King makes dangerous change to gluten-free French fries: Celiac disease alert

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Burger King has announced it is making a significant change to how it prepares French fries. The Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) organization shares that Burger King has stopped cooking its French fries in a separate fryer, so they cannot be considered safe for gluten-free diets. If you are sensitive to gluten or have celiac disease, then you want to avoid the French fries.

The Food Allergy Research & Education organization mentions that Burger King French fries “will no longer be cooked in a separate fryer,” so there is a potential risk of contamination with gluten. The fries will now be cooked in the same fryer as the hash browns, and the hash brown recipe includes wheat flour. Burger King shares that the change occurred on Aug. 3, and it is permanent. The company plans to update its gluten-free information, so consumers are aware that the French fries may contain wheat.

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Burger King currently has an official list of items it considers to be gluten-free, but it clearly states that the list should not be used by people with celiac disease. In addition, the fine print on its website reveals that the actual gluten content of any item can vary based on the supplier, handling procedures and cooking procedures at individual locations. Similar to other fast food chains, Burger King includes a disclaimer that it is not responsible for a person’s allergy or sensitivity to any food item.

Although potatoes are naturally gluten-free, Burger King is not the only fast food chain that has gluten in its French fries. McDonald’s also shares that it uses oil with hydrolyzed wheat to prepare its French fries, so they cannot be considered gluten free. In addition, there is a risk of cross-contamination in the kitchen from other foods that contain gluten.

Read more about celiac disease:
Doctors ignore proper celiac disease diagnosis and care
Celiac disease tripled in children in last 20 years

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