DiaSys, VLA Enter Into Agreement In Veterinary Testing

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DiaSys have entered into a strategic agreement for the development, validation and commercialization of worm egg counting test kits.

As part of the agreement, DiaSys has acquired a license to market the test kits worldwide.

Currently, VLA employs the Improved Modified McMaster Method for worm egg counting, a technique that is considered to be the 'Gold Standard'. It is used routinely for worm egg counts in sheep, goats, deer, cattle, pigs, horses and other exotic species for both research projects and diagnostic samples.

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The new DiaSys/VLA Veterinary Helminth Egg Counting Kit is being developed to replace the current technology and incorporates a filter assembly that is self-contained and disposable. This will eliminate both aerosol and contamination problems and will enable a quicker processing time leading to a more economic test. Validation of the new kit will be for compatibility with the Improved Modified McMaster Method using helminth eggs recovered from sheep and cattle maintained at VLA.

"We are very excited about the partnership with the VLA. The collaboration will create new applications for our Parasep technology and VLA's worldwide reputation as a leader in animal health will assist our product development into the growing market of veterinary testing" said Morris Silverman, DiaSys' Chairman.

VLA's Chief Executive, Steve Edwards, said, "We are very pleased to be teaming up with the DiaSys Corporation to develop new parasitological testing kits. The combination of VLA's expertise in this area and the commitment of DiaSys to develop innovative, practical solutions to animal health diagnostics should ensure a successful partnership."

As all major livestock species of economic importance, including companion animals are exposed to challenge from a broad range of parasites, the development of new diagnostic kits will contribute to improving animal health. It is estimated that the losses inflicted on producers at a global level runs into billions of dollars.

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