Holding an Independent Job Reduces Autistic Symptoms

Autism Jobs
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Without a doubt, when an individual is given responsibility, they are given the opportunity to mature and shed improper behavior; autistic individuals are no different, particularly if they are given the chance to hold a job and build a career off of it. It means the beginning of an independent life, or perhaps even less dependability.

There are many benefits to working, particularly from a young age. Autistic adolescents, like any other young adult, would find it important to find him or herself and establish a positive self-esteem. There are four types of workers:

  • Most invested: Work over 20 hours a week, steadily
  • Steady: Invested in their work, but moderate the hours spent on the job to less than 20 hour a week
  • Occasional: The hours are fewer than 20 a week and these individuals do not work for enough months to merit a good understanding of the job or his character by the employees
  • Sporadic:Though these individuals work hard and over 20 hours when they go at it, the months spent on the job are not enough to ensure the necessary learning or allow for advancements.

Working from Early Teens

What they gain through working from a young age is a sense of responsibility, self-worth, and confidence. Depending on the type of worker they had been, most of these individuals will land better jobs in the future. The Most invested will move onto vocational schools or community colleges where they try to become adults the quickest way possible and launch their careers. The best are the occasional workers it seems, as well as the steady, who will move onto university after acing their high school courses and possibly grabbing a few extracurricular prizes. The sporadic ones are the most likely to fall through the cracks and use the cash earned to fund rather self-harming activities such as drugs and alcohol. Those who have worked from middle to high school ages have more opportunities for advancement in the future, having learned more skills and acquired more knowledge along the way. They understand the professional world better and seem to establish a strong resilience against stressors that would otherwise pull them into depression or reduce their self-worth.

Autistic children require the learning experience more than anyone else. They often feel inadequate, different, wondering what is wrong with their brain. They grow up with their parents understanding them, but the rest of the world does not and dealing with that can become extremely frustrating. Coping mechanisms need to be developed and one's identity solidified. Certain jobs are deemed great while others not so appropriate given the general autism symptoms.

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How holding a Job Affects Autism

A Vanderbilt University study newly released its finding on the link between an independent vocational job and autistic symptom severity. As such, when looking at 153 adults on the spectrum, it was found that having such a career to look forward to every morning helped improve behavior and daily living skills.

The study in itself is long term, with the results collected on average ever 5.5 years. The average age of the participants was 30 years old, which means that they had enough time to develop both physically and mentally to get the job done.

Behavior improvements were seen in symptoms including:

  • Restricted interests
  • Repetitive behaviors
  • Communication impairments
  • Difficulties with social interactions

At the moment, there are not enough autistic individuals in the world's workforce, with over 50% left unemployed. Some countries have much higher rates to offer, which is quite saddening in itself. America has stepped up and proactively is pursuing lowering this incredibly high number to a decent amount, hopefully allowing it to be on par with the overall unemployment country rates. Certain companies like Microsoft and Intel who work in the IT business currently have rather high numbers of autistic employees, which also paved the way towards autism insurance.

In conclusion, have your autistic children start working neighborhood jobs from the earliest years possible, just before high school, and keep encouraging them to explore new opportunities and find what jobs suits the autistic mind they were born with best; this will ensure they are happy, healthy, and with reduced behavioral issues that would normally become your concern.

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