Try unsweetened tea instead of sugary soda to prevent diabetes

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Unsweetened tea

Researchers have determined that there is an association between prediabetes and the regular consumption of sugary beverages. This association is not seen with diet soda.

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Diabetes has become a health problem of enormous concerns. Researchers have determined there is an association between drinking sugary beverages and diabetes. This knowledge can be used to lower your risk for diabetes.

There is an association between prediabetes and the regular consumption of sugary beverages

Tufts University reported that there is an association between prediabetes and the regular consumption of sugary beverages. This same association has not been seen with the consumption of diet soda.

This study was based on an epidemiological analysis of data which was taken from 1,685 adult Americans. It was determined that regularly drinking beverages which are sweetened with sugar is linked to an increase in the risk for prediabetes and an increase in resistance to insulin. There was no such association observed with diet soda.

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High consumption of sugar sweetened beverage was associated with increased insulin resistance

This epidemiological analysis was led by scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. Adults who regularly drank sugar sweetened beverages, or approximately one can of sugary soda daily, were observed to have a 46 percent increased risk of getting prediabetes in comparison to low or non consumers of sugary soda over a period of 14 years. High consumption of sugar sweetened beverage was also observed to be associated with increased insulin resistance, which is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

Senior study author Nicola McKeown, Ph.D. said that although this study can not establish causality, the results nevertheless suggest that high consumption of sugar sweetened beverage increases the risk of getting early warning signs for type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle changes should be made for people with prediabetes to avoid developing diabetes.

These findings support recommendations to limit the consumption of sugar sweetened beverages

McKeown says these findings support recommendations to limit the consumption of sugar sweetened beverages. It is suggested to replace sugary drinks with healthier alternatives such as unsweetened tea, coffee or water. This simple modification of the diet could have substantial health benefits.

This study has been published in the Journal of Nutrition. Researchers at Tufts University have determined there is a positive association between drinking sugary beverages and progression of insulin resistance and prediabetes. It is clearly therefore advisable to limit the consumption of sugary drinks while leading an active lifestyle with good nutrition in order to prevent diabetes.

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Comments

The authors of this paper acknowledge that their paper in no way proves that beverages with sugar uniquely cause prediabetes. In fact, credible health organizations such as The Mayo Clinic note that the risk factors for prediabetes include weight, inactivity, race and family history, among others. When it comes to overweight and obesity, America’s beverage companies recognize that we have a role to play. We are making a difference through the voluntary actions we are taking to reduce sugar and calories consumed from beverages - and by working together as competitors. Through our efforts, we’ve engaged with prominent public health groups on how best to help people moderate their calories in what is the single-largest voluntary effort by any industry to address obesity and obesity-related conditions.
An association is often enough for me, as a consumer! Why drink this junk anyway. It is empty calories, contains phosphates that rob our bones of minerals and just makes people want more of the same.n