There is hope for treatment of Alzheimer's with diet and probiotics

Feb 12 2017 - 7:50am
Dementia

Researchers have found that bacteria in the gut may play a significant role in Alzheimer’s disease. This finding opens up new considerations for prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's.

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Alzheimer's is a devastating type of dementia that leads to memory loss and loss of other intellectual abilities. It becomes difficult for people suffering from Alzheimer's to deal with the tasks necessary to get along in daily life. Researchers say there may be hope for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's with diet and new kinds of probiotics.

Bacteria in the gut may play a significant role in Alzheimer’s disease

It has been reported by Lund University that the bacteria in the gut may play a significant role in Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers have discovered that the development of Alzheimer's disease can be accelerated by bacteria in the intestines. This finding opens up new considerations for prevention and treatment of this illness.

Bacteria in our gut have a significant impact on how we feel

The bacteria in our gut have a significant impact on how we feel due to the interaction between our immune system, our intestinal mucosa and what we eat. The composition of our gut bacteria is determined by the bacteria which we receive at the time of birth, our diet and our genes.

Beta-amyloid plaques develop at nerve fibers in Alzheimer's sufferers

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The researchers studied healthy and diseased mice. They observed that the mice who were afflicted with Alzheimer’s do not have the same composition of gut bacteria as the mice that are healthy. There were some mice that didn't have any bacteria in the gut who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease. These mice had a markedly lower amount of beta-amyloid plaque in the brain. Lumps which form at the nerve fibers in sufferers of Alzheimer’s disease are called beta-amyloid plaques.

There was a direct causal association between the gut bacteria and Alzheimer’s disease in mice

When the researchers transferred intestinal bacteria from mice suffering from Alzherimer's disease to mice which were germ free the mice developed a greater amount of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain than if they were given bacteria from mice that were not sick. Researcher Frida Fåk Hållenius said this study showed that there was a direct causal association between the gut bacteria and Alzheimer’s disease.

This study has been published in Scientific Reports. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia in the western world. At this time there is no cure for this terrible neurodegenerative illness. Researchers at Lund University say that it appears a person's microbiota may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

This finding opens the door for investigations of new strategies for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease via diet and new kinds of probiotics aimed at altering the gut microbiota. There is therefore now new hope on the horizons for sufferers of Alzheimer's disease and their families.

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Comments

If there is a deficiency of probiotics there must be a reason as the small intestine releases juices containing probiotic bacteria when triggered to do so by the brain.It is indeed doubtful if probiotics survive the journey through the 3 different chemicals, namely; 1) Bile from the liver; 2) Pancreatic juice from the pancreas and 3) Intestinal juice from glands in the intestinal wall. These juices replace gut flora continually and complete the digestion of starch, fats and protein. Probiotics consist out of starch, fats and protein and will be digested like all fats, starches and protein. There then absorbed into the blood and lymphatic system.