Poor Indoor Air Quality Can Trigger Headache

Armen Hareyan's picture
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According to the National Headache Foundation (NHF), the first week in June is Headache Awareness Week, and DUCTZ Indoor Air Professionals, the nation's leading air duct cleaning business, is advising consumers on the relationship between poor indoor air quality and headache triggers.

According to the NHF and a report entitled Indoor Air Pollution, published by the American Lung Association (ALA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the American Medical Association, the following are indoor air quality issues that can be major headache triggers:

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1. Carbon Monoxide exposure: When a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system is not functioning properly, it can leak Carbon Monoxide in to the residence, which can cause headaches among other symptoms. DUCTZ recommends having your HVAC system inspected annually.

2. Environmental Tobacco Smoke: A complex concoction of over 4000 chemicals, many being toxic, environmental tobacco smoke can wreak havoc on the health of those who experience frequent exposure. Contrary to popular belief, ventilating a smoking area with common methods such as opening a window does not remove the dangerous carcinogens from the air. The best way to prevent tobacco smoke from triggering a headache or causing any of the other ill side-effects is to avoid exposure, and to insist that smoking be done outdoors.

3. Sick Building Syndrome (SBS): Common in office and apartment buildings, SBS refers to the situation in which the population of a building shares similar symptoms, and experiences the alleviation of symptoms upon removal from the shared environment. A contaminated HVAC system can be a contributor to this situation, and one of the chief physical complaints is headaches. If you suspect SBS in your office or apartment building, contact your building manager promptly.

"As indoor air professionals, the DUCTZ family sees it as our duty to go beyond HVAC reconditioning and restoration to look out for the overall well-being of our customers," said John Rotche, President of DUCTZ. "It is our hope that this advice will help the mission of National Headache Awareness Week, and help our customers avoid a potentially painful situation."

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