Natural Harmony Foods To Reduce Childhood Obesity

Armen Hareyan's picture
Advertisement

Natural Harmony Foods will support not for profit organizations, which work to combat childhood obesity.

Natural Harmony Foods produces unique foods and meals under the SoLean brand combining all natural real meat with high quality soy protein. These foods are not only made with delicious, juicy beef and pork, but are also 70-80% lower in fat and saturated fat than typical meat-based foods.

Advertisement

According to the Centers for Disease Control, the prevalence of overweight children aged 6 to 11 more than doubled in the past 20 years, going from 7% in 1980 to 18.8% in 2004. The rate among adolescents aged 12 to 19 more than tripled, increasing from 5% to 17.1%. Being overweight is the result of caloric imbalance (too few calories expended for the amount of calories consumed) and is mediated by genetics and health. An estimated 61% of overweight young people have at least one additional risk factor for heart disease, such as high cholesterol or high blood pressure. By providing foods that are healthier, lower in fat and saturated fat, and also taste great, companies such as Natural Harmony Foods can help children and families lose weight and achieve healthier lifestyles.

Partnerships among food companies and organizations aimed at increasing fitness provide solutions to today's obesity epidemic. Natural Harmony Foods will support the efforts of Ironfish Athletic Ministries & Fitness (IAM Fitness), founded in 2004 in Vancouver, Washington, by Rodney Hawthorne, by providing donations and healthy food products. IAM Fitness provides free personal fitness training and mentoring to obese, fatherless, at-risk kids and holds drug free sporting events for kids and adults.

Says Sam Dewar, CEO of Natural Harmony Foods, "While we're a young and small company, we can start to help in this worthy cause with small donations of product and money. We make products that are healthy and they taste great, kids love them. We want to make them available to kids from all economic backgrounds, at home and in schools."

Advertisement