Did Steve Jobs Have a Liver Transplant?

Steve Jobs Liver Transplant
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Many of the major newspapers are reporting that Steve Jobs, the chief executive of Apple Inc, received a liver transplant about two months ago. There is no confirmation of the report by either Jobs or Apple.

It is known that Jobs, 53, was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer five years ago. In January Steve Jobs handed the day-to-day reins to Tim Cook. At that time, he said he would be away from the job until the end of June.

There was a question at that time of a “hormone imbalance” being the cause of his weight loss. Could it have been a recurrence of his pancreatic cancer with liver damage? Perhaps if he had a liver transplant, it was a liver-pancreas combination transplant. Confirmation of the liver transplantation has not been given.

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The pancreas is an organ located in the middle of the upper abdomen, surrounded by the stomach, small intestine, liver and spleen. It produces insulin, glucagon, and enzymes to help digest your food.

The exact cause of pancreatic cancer is not known, but the following are known risk factors:

  • Age – most pancreatic cancer occur in people over 60 years
  • Smoking – people who smoke are 2-3 times more likely than nonsmokers to develop pancreatic cancer
  • Male – more men than women seem to develop pancreatic cancer
  • African Americans are more likely than Asians, Hispanics, or whites to get pancreatic cancer
  • Family history -- The risk for developing pancreatic cancer triples if a person's mother, father, sister, or brother had the disease. Also, a family history of colon or ovarian cancer increases the risk of pancreatic cancer.

Treatment for people with pancreatic cancer will depending on the type and stage. Pancreatic cancer may be treated with surgery, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of therapies,

For more information on liver transplantation:
University of Maryland Transplant Program

Sources
Apple Media Library
National Institute of Health – Section on Pancreatic Cancer
John Hopkins Medicine

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