Home remedies that work to stop smoking

Kathleen Blanchard's picture
Stop smoking with these home remedies

Here are home remedies that can actually work to help you stop smoking.

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You want to stop smoking, but you don’t know where to start. The idea of medication terrifies you, especially given commercials describing side effects that in themselves can lead to nightmares and more. Not to mention the cost of smoking cessation aids and prescriptions.

These home remedies that can help you kick the nicotine habit are also scientifically proven.

Combined with a genuine desire to stop smoking, we think these alternatives just might help you remain smoke-free.

Fruits and vegetables

Get yourself over to the local farmer’s market and load up on fruits and vegetables. Research has shown that people who eat lots of fruits and veggies are able to stop smoking and stay smoke-free.

No one knows why the healthy foods help with kicking the nicotine habit. A study from University at Buffalo researchers suggests it may be that adopting one healthy habit starts a cascade of events that leads to the next.

Plus, you can always use a carrot stick to help break that habit of having something in your hands, mouth, or dangling from your lips.

The finding was published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco research.

Study participants that ate the most fruits and veggies were more likely to be tobacco free after 30 days and at six months.

That’s pretty powerful considering it doesn’t take much time, effort or investment to boost your fruit and vegetable intake.

Fresh Lime

Lime juice stands out as a natural way to help with quitting smoking. It isn’t as good a nicotine replacement gums or patches, but it is palatable and non-toxic - and very inexpensive.

Here’s how to do it:

Cut the lime into quarters and then cut those quarters into 4 pieces again.
Each time you crave a cigarette, suck on a piece of the lime; then chew the skin
Make sure you put the remaining pieces in a cool storage, wrapped in plastic or other inside a container for the next time you need a slice.

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Exercise

There is no hard evidence that exercise can help people stop smoking for good. But getting out for a walk or a run just might help reduce cravings - for the short term. Sometimes that’s all we need is for the urge to smoke to pass.

Smoking cessation programs tell us to focus on changing our habits. Instead of reaching for a cigarette, try getting up and moving. Exercise increases the heart rate, acting the same as nicotine. Even if the evidence is lacking, I can’t think of any reason not to recommend some form of exercise if you’re trying to stop smoking. Speak with your doctor if you have been sedentary, before starting any exercise program.

Give yourself a massage

Nicotine withdrawal can make us feel anxious. To allay nervousness from not having a cigarette, try giving yourself a hand and ear massage.

A small study published in 1999 showed people experiencing nicotine withdrawal reported fewer symptoms from self massage. Plus, once again, you’ll be doing something different with your hands that feels good and certainly won’t hurt.

Enroll in an online program

The American Lung Association has a great online program that won’t cost you a thing for the basic program - “Freedom from Smoking”

If you need more help, the cost for additional support is much cheaper than cigarettes and of course, in the long run, immeasurable in dollars when it comes to your long-term health. You can also check out smokefree.gov.

Meditation

Yup, meditation is an easy remedy that could help nicotine cravings and help you stop smoking. The reason is because it helps us become more mindful of what we’re doing.

Mindful meditation releases endorphins that help us feel better. It calms anxiety and helps the body heal.

You can easily find guided meditation programs online. When you feel the urge to smoke, take time away from what you’re doing and just become mindful of your surrounding, your breathe and your body.

References:

University at Buffalo
PubMed.gov
Cochrane Review
“Smoking Cravings are reduced by self-massage”
Drug and Alcohol Dependence

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