Whole Grain Food Eaters Have Lower Risk of Heart Failure

Armen Hareyan's picture
Advertisement

People with high whole-grain intake have a lower risk of heart failure than those who eat more high-fat dairy and eggs, according to researchers from the University of Minnesota, the University of North Carolina and the University of Texas Health Sciences Center.

A 13-year study of 14,153 African-American and white adults 45-64 years old from four U.S. communities investigated the relationships between heart failure incidents (death or hospitalization) and intake of seven food categories (whole grains, fruits/vegetables, fish, nuts, high-fat dairy, egg and red meat). During that time, 1,140 heart failure hospitalizations occurred. After adjusting for variables such as energy intake, demographics, lifestyle factors, prevalent cardiovascular disease, diabetes and hypertension, it was determined that participants with greater whole-grain intake had lower risk for heart failure than those who consumed more eggs and high-fat dairy.

The researchers concluded: "It would be prudent to recommend that those at high risk of heart failure increase their intake of whole grains and reduce intake of high-fat dairy foods and eggs, along with following other healthful dietary practices."

Research studies featured in the November 2008 Journal of the American Dietetic Association include:

Advertisement

* Cognitive, Behavioral and Social Factors are Associated with Bias in 9-11 Year Old Schoolchildren's Dietary Questionnaire Self Reports

* Providing Obesity Prevention Counseling to Children During a Primary Care Clinic Visit: Results From a Pilot Study

* Grains Are Similarly Categorized by 8-13 Year Old Children

* Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity in Child Care: What Parents Recommend

* Black Children With High Preferences for Fruits and Vegetables are at Less Risk of Being at Risk of Overweight or Overweight.

Advertisement