Freeman Doesn't Understand His Diabetes

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When Georgetown's Austin Freeman started experiencing symptoms of diabetes, he thought it was a stomach flu. Once word got out that he has diabetes, the media spread the word like wildfire. Freeman isn't even sure what type of diabetes he has, all he is sure of, is hoping to be a mentor for other athletes battling the disease.

Hoya's coack, John Thompson III, told the Star-Ledger that he has a constant eye on Freeman in the game. “I’m watching him, trying to read his body language. Fortunately we have a great medical staff, so that’s all they’re doing. But at the same time, you’ve just got to watch him.”

Diabetes is not an uncommon condition for athletes. Millions of people in the U.S. are undiagnosed, it's likely the star basketball player has had diabetes for years. Symptoms of type 1 and type 2 are similar.

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According the American Diabetes Association, type 1 symptoms include frequent urination, unusual thirst, extreme hunger, unusual weight loss, extreme fatigue and irritability. Type 2 symptoms include any of the above mentioned, as well as frequent infections, blurred vision, cuts or bruises that are slow to heal, tingling or numbness in the hands or feet, and recurring skin, gum, or bladder infections.

“Absolutely, I worry about his emotional state,” Thompson said. “A lot of people, a lot of media, a lot of fans almost talk about it like it’s a sprained ankle. ‘Will he be able to go tomorrow?’ or ‘Can he play?’ The emotional adjustment and acceptance of, ‘I have diabetes, I have this disease for the rest of my life.’ But it’s so much more than that. The emotional adjustment and acceptance has been extremely difficult.”

Analysts have recently declared diabetes a world-wide epidemic. Estimates show that diabetes will most likely double or triple by 2020. Many of the reasons attributing to the exponential increase involve obesity and poor diet, but a number of diabetics are born with the disease.

Written by Amy Munday

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Comments

You are dead wrong. No treatment or lackthereof can cause Type 1 diabetes. It is an autoimmune disease that has no known cause or cure. Please do not write about something in which you know nothing about!
Did you analyze the information about the side effects of diabetes treatments from Mayo Clinic?
Mayo clinic or some other type 2 diabetes treatment drug side effect lists hypoglycemia as a risk.
Why did you decide not to post my comment? Is it because you now know that you were so wrong to write what you did in that so called article? You should do your research before you report on a topic you obviously know nothing about.
I'm not in charge of posting comments.
I am wondering where you got your facts that "diabetes is not uncommon in athletes." What information do you have to back that up? Like Leslie said, Type 1 Diabetes cannot be stopped or cured. There is nothing that can be done to stop it. It happens regardless of how a person lives their life. Infants, children, and adults can all be diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.
Diabetes effects 23.6 million people, or 7.8 percent of the population. To say any of those people are not athletes would be more inaccurate. (American Diabetes Association) Here's a website to look into: http://kids.jdrf.org/index.cfm?page_id=109851 , I never said diabetes can be stopped or cured, and I never said it only effected a certain age of the population.
but a number of diabetics are born with the disease *Nobody* is born with diabetes. Please, dear author, please get your facts correct and not from the Oprah/Dr Oz episode.
"some people are born more likely to get diabetes than others." And continue on reading here: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/genetics-of-diabetes.html. P.S. this information isn't coming from Dr. Oz or Oprah, it's coming from the American Diabetes Association. Since I'm only a reporter, and not a doctor, I have to pick and choose my sources. This, in my opinion, is a credible source.
Please check your facts and your spelling.
Reporting on breaking stories in a short time frame, including research, may cause a few typos. If there are further editing mistakes you have a problem with, point them out and they will be fixed after approval, this goes for facts as well.