Autism Rates In California and Oregon Linked to Rainfall

Armen Hareyan's picture
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A new study published by the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine links Autism to precipitation rates in California, Oregon, and Washington counties.

The abstract of the research on Autism rates and rainfall titled Autism Prevalence and Precipitation Rates in California, Oregon, and Washington Counties reads the following.

To investigate empirically the possibility of an environmental trigger for autism among genetically vulnerable children that is positively associated with precipitation.

We used regression analysis to investigate autism prevalence rates and counts first in relation to mean annual county-level precipitation and then to the amount of precipitation a birth cohort was exposed to when younger than 3 years, controlling for time trend, population size, per capita income, and demographic characteristics. In some models, we included county fixed-effects rather than a full set of covariates.

Counties in California, Oregon, and Washington.

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Participants Children born in California, Oregon, and Washington between 1987 and 1999.

Main Exposure County-level precipitation.

Main Outcome Measures County-level autism prevalence rates and counts.

County-level autism prevalence rates and counts among school-aged children were positively associated with a county's mean annual precipitation. Also, the amount of precipitation a birth cohort was exposed to when younger than 3 years was positively associated with subsequent autism prevalence rates and counts in Oregon counties and California counties with a regional developmental services center.

These results are consistent with the existence of an environmental trigger for autism among genetically vulnerable children that is positively associated with precipitation. Further studies focused on establishing whether such a trigger exists and identifying the specific trigger are warranted.

Essentially, the authors claim that the abundance of precipitation might cause younger children to spend more time indoors, where they are more exposed to various environmental factors such as exposure to household chemicals and pollutants, lack of vitamin D from exposure to the sun, or increased television viewing.

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Comments

How interesting about autism. One of my latest encounters about autism was during my last Transatlantic flight. A little boy on the back seat was autistic. It was very difficult. I felt so sorry for him and the mother. She said what can I do my child is suffering from autism. She felt uncomfortable too because of the child. My prayers go out to them.
Estimates concerning autism rates? Evidence is beginning to come out that more kids may have autism than are diagnosed. A study from South Korea is being released which contends that it is more common than most think. The study found that more children actually had autism than were diagnosed with autism among the general population. Autism could be affecting more individuals than current estimates indicate. I found this here: <a title="Autism rates might be underestimated according to study" href="http://www.newsytype.com/5975-autism-rates/">Autism rates could be higher than previously thought</a>