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10 Must-Have Supplements to Make Your Thanksgiving More Enjoyable

2012-11-21 11:07
Vitamin Supplements and Thanksgiving

There’s no two ways around it. For many of us Thanksgiving is a time of unbridled enthusiasm as we over-indulge in one dish after another eating like it’s the last Thanksgiving we will ever see again.

As a result, after the last tender morsel of succulent, yet ever-so-perfect crispy roast turkey skin is gone; after the mashed potatoes volcano’d with melted butter for lava have been scraped from our plates; after the sundry pies, cakes, cream puffs and other sugar laden deserts have provided enough blood sugar to send Dr. Oz screaming for yet another latest, favorite, belly-fat busting, detox miracle cure drink discovered in an small village in some exotic locale—it is time to pay the gastrointestinal piper as we lay in a turkey coma’d stupor holding our stomachs and hoping the pain and discomfort we feel are not signs of the first throes of food poisoning.

Oh the joys and sweet sorrow of gluttony.

But there is hope and possibly at least a few cures that will do wonders for an ailing stomach. Summarized below is a list of 10 supplements that are generally recommended to ease stomach pain, aid digestion and make for a more enjoyable Thanksgiving holiday.

Thanksgiving Supplement #1: DGL

DCL stands for stands for De-Glycyrrhizinated Licorice. Licorice contains a naturally occurring substance known as glycyrrhizin that is known for its side effects of water retention and elevated blood pressure. The de-glycyrrhizinated form, however, is safe and is reported by health notables such as Dr. Andrew Weil as a natural supplement for treating heartburn and gastric acid reflux disease.

DCL works by increasing the release of mucin from mucous cells in the stomach, which provides a protective coat to the stomach’s inner surface. Furthermore, DCL also decreases the level of acidity in the stomach. For optimal results, 1-2 DGL tablets must be chewed and swallowed 20-30 minutes before a meal and before bedtime.

Thanksgiving Supplement #2: Probiotics

Probiotics are known as the “friendly bacteria” that are relatives of the good gut bacteria your body needs for maintaining a healthy digestive environment. Probiotic supplements are beneficial in treating diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and are typically eaten with a glass of milk, a malted shake or added to your favorite flavor of yogurt. Some yogurt brands are sold advertised with probiotics already supplied.

Thanksgiving Supplement #3: Chamomile

Chamomile supplement—especially as a tea—has been used for many years by naturalists and mothers in-the-know as one remedy for relaxing a distraught child with anxiety or who has trouble sleeping. An added benefit is that some attest that chamomile can also treat digestive problems such as upset stomach, colic and nausea. One contraindication is that it probably should not be used by people who have allergies to ragweed and related species of plants.

Thanksgiving Supplement #4: L-Glutamine

L-Glutamine is a naturally occurring amino acid in the body that is known for its ability to aid the digestive system. It is reported to help individuals with too much bad bacteria in their gut that causes diarrhea, and it may increase the absorption of nutrients during digestion.

Thanksgiving Supplement #5: Peppermint Oil

Peppermint oil supplied in capsule supplement form is believed to be especially beneficial for people with irritable bowel syndrome for the treatment of digestive tract pain and bloating. According to some sources, peppermint oil works by reducing spasms in the digestive tract.

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Thanksgiving Supplement #6: Ginger

Taking ginger as a powder, in capsule or tablet forms, or from freshly sliced root has been used for centuries in Asian medicine as a natural way to treat stomachaches and reportedly can also relieve nausea and vomiting during a pregnancy.

Thanksgiving Supplement #7: Artichoke

Extract from the artichoke leaf taken daily is reported to relieve indigestion, reduce nausea, vomiting, gas and abdominal pain as well as provide help for people with irritable bowel syndrome. Artichoke is believed to work by stimulating the release of bile from the liver and reportedly works on reducing heartburn as well as recovering from a hangover due to imbibing in too much holiday spirits. Like chamomile, it too is contraindicated for people who are allergic to ragweed and related plants with allergenic pollens.

Thanksgiving Supplement #8: Psyllium

Need more fiber in your diet? Psyllium is a natural fiber that is an important ingredient in many laxatives. The fiber helps absorb water from the intestines and “bulks up” the stool for easier passage through your colon. One contraindication is for people who are allergic to English plantain pollen, grass pollen, or melon could have a serious allergic reaction with taking psyllium.


Thanksgiving Supplement #9: Lemon balm

A member of the mint family, lemon balm used alone or with other herbal concoctions is used for treating digestive problems such as an upset stomach, gas, bloating, nausea and vomiting, colic, abdominal pain and headaches. Another reported benefit of lemon balm is that it appears to have some sedative-like effects and can be used for anxiety, restlessness and sleep disorders.

Thanksgiving Supplement #10: Calcium Carbonate

The one tried and true method of treating heartburn is calcium carbonate—the primary ingredient found in many over the counter antacid heartburn medications such as TUMS. Calcium carbonate is the same kind of white chalk you’ve seen used on chalk boards in school. When taking calcium carbonate, be sure to dissolve it in water or chew it thoroughly before consuming. One warning is that taking calcium carbonate can interfere with the activity of some medications and should be okayed by a physician beforehand for personal use.

For 20 tips on how to lose your belly fat after this Thanksgiving, follow this link to an article titled "National Nutrition Month Belly Fat Blasting Foods."

Image Source: Courtesy of MorgueFile

References:

DGL info sheet

WebMD

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