Irregular Exercise Pattern May Add Pounds

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2008-02-04 10:40

The consequences of quitting exercise may be greater than previously thought, according to a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that determined that the weight gained during an exercise hiatus can be tough to shed when exercise is resumed at a later date.

The study, conducted by Paul Williams of Berkeley Lab's Life Sciences Division, found that the key to staying trim is to remain active year-round, year-after-year, and to avoid seasonal and irregular exercise patterns. Most of all, don't quit. Failure to do so may be a contributing factor in the nation's obesity epidemic.

"The price to pay for quitting exercise is higher than expected, and this price may be an important factor in the obesity epidemic affecting Americans," says Williams, whose study is published in the February issue of the journal Medicine & Science in Sports and Exercise.

The study should prompt people to think twice before taking a break from their exercise regimens, despite the pressures of family and work obligations, or waning motivation.

Using data collected from the National Runners' Health Study, Williams found that the impacts of increasing and decreasing vigorous exercise aren't the same among all runners. At distances above 20 miles per week in men and 10 miles per week in women, the pounds gained by running less were about the same as the pounds lost by running more. At these exercise levels, the effects of training and quitting training are comparable, and the weight gains and losses associated with changes in exercise levels are probably reversible.

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