Medical Myths or Reading Between The Lines?

2004-03-25 07:30

Learn to read between the lines of what the medical reports actually mean. Here are a few simplistic words and phrases to help you to know if the findings are accurate, true or tentative with no real backbone. This list by no means includes all mythic phrases or concepts.

We live in a confusing world of health these days. One day your read that a study says this is okay and a month later you find out it wasn't. The best idea is to read those reports for yourself, but you need to know how to decipher them, if they are legit or just some company's way of selling their product.

Rule number one is knowing if a study is legitimate or not. Find out who paid for the study and why it was done and who did the study. First, if it's paid for by a company who will benefit by a positive or negative outcome, then 99.9% of the time it is tracked by a person or people who hold the preconceived view before the study began. Does that make it realistic? Yes and no. Even in the worst study there will be a tidbit of truth and helpful knowledge. Finding what that is, means deciphering their written report. That can be tricky and will take some know how.

Here are a few simplistic words and phrases to help you to know if the findings are accurate, true or tentative with no real backbone. This list by no means includes all mythic phrases or concepts.

  • "Appears to be" = We don't have any real answers but maybe it is and maybe it isn't.

  • "Generally encouraging" = For our company/business anyway, probably not your health.

  • "Has not been proven" = Can't accept the findings of previous studies and it's not to that researcher's way of thinking.

  • "Essential Hypertension" = 90% of blood pressures and cause has never been established or studied.

  • "The data suggests an association between"
Source: 
Lena Sanchez
Health and Wellness: 
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