Deprivation Doubles Cervical Cancer Risk

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2008-12-05 02:46

Women living in the most deprived areas of England are nearly twice as likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer than their affluent counterparts – according to a report presented by national cancer director Professor Mike Richards at the Britain Against Cancer conference.

The report, published by the National Cancer Intelligence Network (NCIN), reveals a 'deprivation gap' that researchers believe is mainly fuelled by a lower uptake of cervical screening in deprived areas.

All cases of cancer diagnosed between 1995 and 2004 were included in this nation-wide analysis of the effect of deprivation on cancer incidence, including more than 25,000 cases of cervical cancer.

In the most deprived areas of England, there were 12 women per 100,000 diagnosed with cervical cancer between 2000 and 2004. In the most affluent areas, only 6 per 100,000 women were diagnosed with the disease during the same time period.

Professor David Forman, NCIN information lead who is based at the University of Leeds, said: "These striking figures show there is still much more that needs to be done to tackle cancer in low-income communities.

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