Yoga Benefits Cancer Patients

2009-11-02 16:30

Some of the major cancer centers across the country, including MD Anderson, Memorial Sloan-Kettering, and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, now offer their patients yoga as a complementary therapy in an effort to provide a more integrative approach to care. In addition, some physician-directed programs, such as Dr. Dean Ornish’s Prostate Cancer Lifestyle Trial and the Breast Cancer Personal Support and Lifestyle Integration Program (San Francisco) educate patients in yoga techniques.

Yoga is a form of nonaerobic exercise that involves a program of precise postures, breathing exercises, and meditation. Yoga can be a useful method to help relieve some symptoms of chronic diseases such as cancer and can lead to increased relaxation and physical fitness.

Recent scientific studies do not support yoga as an effective stand-alone treatment for cancer or any other disease; however, it may enhance quality of life by relieving the stress and anxiety associated with disease progression or treatment. Alyson Moadel of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine studied the effects of yoga in breast cancer patients and published her findings in a 2007 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. She found that patients who did yoga saw improvements in social and emotional well-being compared with those who didn’t.

Most studies on yoga and cancer have focused on breast cancer patients, but recently studies have begun to incorporate other cancer patients, including those with lung cancer and colorectal cancer.

Results from recent studies on yoga and cancer show that the complementary therapy can have many benefits for patients, both mentally and physically. Some of the benefits include:

Combating the Side Effects of Treatment
Researchers from the MD Anderson Cancer Center at the University of Texas found that breast cancer patients undergoing radiation treatments were better able to combat feelings of fatigue during a six-week trial of twice-weekly yoga classes in addition to their medical care. The women also had fewer problems with daytime sleepiness.

In the April 2009 journal Psycho-oncology, researchers from Wake Forest University School of Medicine found that restorative, gentle yoga improved fatigue symptoms in women undergoing breast cancer treatment.

Anxiety Relief
When cancer is diagnosed, the news itself can raise anxiety levels tremendously. A small study of cancer patients in Japan published in the Journal of Palliative Medicine found yoga may be effective against anxiety. “Many disorders have a strong stress component, and yoga acts on that," state the study authors. It also "increases resilience and stress-coping capabilities" if practiced long enough.

One of the most important dimensions of yoga practice for cancer patients is breathing, or pranayama. In Sanskrit, prana means breath and yama means extension or control. Many people going through the stress of an illness do not breathe efficiently. Fear can cause the holding of the breath or shallow breathing. Slow, deep breathing can bring oxygen into the body and reduce anxiety.

Reduction of Stress and Cortisol Levels
Chronic stress, such as the daily worry and pressure that a cancer patient typically experiences, can raise stress levels and biochemical markers such as cortisol and cytokine production. Stress reduction exercises, like yoga, can reduce stress and therefore reduce cortisol. Stress has also been shown to exacerbate the growth of tumors and other cancer indicators.

Indian researchers found that yoga decreased salivary cortisol levels in patients with stage 2 and 3 breast cancer. Their research was published in the March 2009 journal Integrative Cancer Therapies.


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Hello Its Ruby Durell from St Michaels Catholic High School and i would like to ask you a few questions, if you would be so kind to answer when you get the chance, it would be most appreciated; For my A level project i am basing it on Dance Therpay as a dancer myself was very interested in researching the elements behind dance which led me to become interested in yoga. i found you by the google website and wanted to talk to you about your work, yoga therapy work with cancer sufferes, patients. My research is on Dance Therapy but i am intrieged especailly about yoga therapy. I would like to ask you; 1) How did you get involved in Yoga Therapy? 2) In what ways is it affective for exmaple; alleviation of suffering? 3) Do you have any interesting case studies? 4) Inspirational teachers, authors that you might recommend to me to research? If not perhaps you could recommend another teacher in this field? Thankyou in anticipation, Yours Sincerely Ruby Durell.