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Fresh Fig, Arugula, and Mascarpone Bruschetta

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2008-08-17 21:18

Fresh figs have a preciously short season (typically from August-October), so now is the time to indulge. Though the vast majority of figs are produced here in California because of its Mediterranean climate, they can be found in most supermarkets across the country. This is a good thing since fresh figs are di rigeur, appearing in everything from sweet jams and tarts to savory salads and chutneys. And let's not forget the touch of grace they add to crostini, pasta and pizza.

These captivating tear-drop shaped fruit are singular in appearance, flavor, and texture. First they lure you in with their sweet perfume. Then they tempt you with delicate skin that is lush with ripeness, revealing droplets of golden honeyed nectar. One bite reveals an irresistibly attractive pink flesh that is second only to its swoon-worthy soft, cool, creamy flesh.

Fresh figs are not at all like dried figs (which I also love), so there are few things to know about them.

Here's how to select fresh figs:

1. Look for richly colored, plump, unblemished fruits with the stems intact. The skin of figs often have a powdery finish, which is normal. They should be tender to the touch, but not squishy. Fully ripe figs often ooze a clear, syrupy substance clear which is a good indicator of its sweetness.

2. If you're not too embarrassed, then take a good whiff. Ripe fresh figs usually emit a delicately sweet fragrance.

3. Since figs do not ripen once they're picked, it’s best to eat them as soon as possible. Otherwise, place unwashed figs in an air-tight container and cover with a piece of paper towel; they should last 1-2 days.

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4. Bring figs to room temperature prior to eating, which will enhance their flavor. Wash them gently, remove the stem, and enjoy.

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