Constipation Is A Big Indicator That This Diet Is Wrong For Diabetics


Apr 17 2017 - 2:19pm
constipation diabetes

Constipation is a major complaint from diabetics, which is easily remedied by understanding the negative effects of the high protein, low carbohydrate diet on digestion that is recommended by medical practitioners to control the disease.

According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 29.1 million Americans are living with diabetes, which remains the seventh leading cause of death since 2010. While not all forms of diabetes are preventable — type 1 diabetes is likely viral — both type 1 and type 2 can be prevented with diet and exercise, but in advanced cases, is currently treated with medications.

The standard diet recommendation for diabetics is a high protein, low carb diet, however, chronic constipation is a frequent complaint reported by this group, which leads to more medicating, instead of dealing with the root cause -- the recommended low carb diet. A change in diet is one of the best laxatives for diabetics.

Diabetic Constipation Is Not “A Thing”

Constipation is very common, as approximately 63 million people in North America experience chronic constipation annually according to a study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Whether you‘re diabetic or not, if you aren’t eating properly your body lets you know about it. Constipation is simply a warning sign, or symptom, that diet is not correct. This is because constipation is a digestive issue with the same cause in diabetics as non-diabetics. Constipation is a diet-related issue caused by improper eating, where chronic constipations, such as IBS with constipation, result in inflammation caused by food sensitivities and intolerances. So, to say diabetics are the only group that experiences constipation is not entirely accurate however, why diabetics struggle with constipation does deserve a simple and easily understood explanation.

Constipation is Ruinous to Gut Health

Any backup in the gut can present serious and long-term health problems to diabetics and non-diabetics alike, since gut health is essential to overall health. Movement in the gut is particularly important which is why eating high amounts of fiber has been likely recommended by your doctor. Unfortunately for many diabetics this translates to eating FiberOne bars for example, or cereals and bran muffins, which is processed and binding, instead of the correct form of fiber, which involves eating more plant-based foods like http://www.emaxhealth.com/13638/12-foods-reverse-type-2-diabetes-and-do-not-spike-blood-sugar fruit and vegetables.

According to the best selling diet/health/nutrition book EAT! – Empower. Adjust. Triumph!: Lose Ridiculous Weight, “Diet is an important factor in shaping the gut’s ecosystem. There are ten times more bacterial cells in your body than there are human cells. As humans, we are made mostly of bacteria and it’s that bacteria that produces chemicals that help us harness energy and nutrients from our food.”

Foods that are processed, and even those that contain so-called high fiber, can create a slowing of movement in the digestive tract. When foods like these are coupled with a high protein diet, the result is a backup in the gut. Backup in the gut occurs when food stops or moves slowly through the intestinal tract and putrefies causing poisonous ammonia gas to leak out from the intestines and into the bloodstream. This toxic overtake is known as intestinal permeability, and it’s damaging to how your body assimilates nutrients, as well as your overall health and in the long term, your weight.

Not surprisingly, changes in gut microbiota are associated with increasing obesity according to the journal Science. A study was conducted on fat mice whose gut flora was weakened by antibiotics. Their gut bacteria (flora) were injected into the skinny mice and the skinny mice began gaining weight, proving beyond a shadow of a doubt that gut health determines the rate at which we lose or gain weight. This gut health/weight gain connection may be especially true for those with so-called autoimmune disease, who are dealing with inflammation, food sensitivities and intestinal permeability.

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