Coffee Reduces Risk of Alzheimer's Disease: Direct Evidence

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2012-06-05 09:46

It would be too bold a move at this point to say that drinking coffee prevents Alzheimer's disease. However, the results of a new study indicate that older adults with mild memory problems who drink a moderate amount of coffee each day will not progress to Alzheimer's disease or at least will have a significant delay before converting to this most common type of dementia.

The good news about coffee and caffeine

One of the first things to point out about this study is that it involved the use of caffeinated coffee--not decaf. In fact, the investigators measured levels of caffeine in the study participants' blood and from there determined that about three cups of coffee daily was the "magic" number needed to achieve the benefits observed in the study.

Here's what the investigators discovered among the 124 individuals ages 65 to 88 who participated in the study. The researchers focused on people with early signs of Alzheimer's disease, a condition called mild cognitive impairment (MCI), as about 15% of people with MCI progress to full-blown Alzheimer's disease each year.

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Comments

My mother is in the advanced stages of Alzheimer's Disease. I also watched my grandmother die from this disease. I worry about it as I have had problems with short term memory for a long time. I have never been good at remembering names or what I have read. My Mother is 91 and has been unable to care for herself for seven years. I don't ever want to live this way. I have relatives that have their own final plans made to ensure they don't live this way. I cannot do that due to religious beliefs. It hurts so deeply to see my Mother pick her butter off her potato with her fingers, to just sit and stare, to talk and not be understood, to not be able to control her bodily functions, to swear and get angry (which she did not do prior to Alzheimer's). Just so many things.
Watching a loved one gradually advance through Alzheimer's disease is so very difficult. I have done it, but everyone's experience is different, so I cannot say I know exactly what you are going through. It can help to talk to others who are experiencing the same thing (support groups, church group). I wish you the best.

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