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3 ways to make safe natural lipstick

2013-04-27 20:59
3 recipes for non-toxic lipstick to make at home

Is lipstick really toxic? Probably not, according to the FDA, despite widespread internet discussion that lipstick contains lead. Nevertheless, lead found in lipsticks left consumers wondering about the safety of a number of cosmetics.

As an alternative to leaded lipstick, you might consider making your own lipstick at home for a fraction of the cost you would pay at the cosmetic counter. Whether or not lipstick is toxic, the question remains, why would anyone choose to put lead on their lips?

You can enjoy your favorite lip color and express a bit of creativity at the same time with these homemade solutions.

Crayon Lipstick

Crayons are made from paraffin wax that is safe and harmless. To make a non-toxic and inexpensive lipstick at home, choose your favorite oil for the base and mix your colors. The result of the combinations can be endless.

You can even make your own gloss without the color to keep your lips moist or for treating chapped lips.

What you will need:

  • ½ crayon in the desired color
  • ½ teaspoon of jojoba oil for gloss - you can also use coconut oil
  • A small chunk of Shea butter about the size of an almond
  • Crush the crayon into small pieces and then mix the pieces with jojoba and Shea butter in a small bowl. Next, simmer water on the stove and put the bowl on top, stirring until the mixture is blended. Put the mixture in containers and put the lipsticks in the refrigerator. TIP: Tap the containers while they cool to stop bubbles from forming. After it cools, just put it on your lips.

    On a recent episode of “The Doctors” TV show, it was noted the average woman carries about $400 worth of makeup in her cosmetic bag. Making cosmetics at home can be much less expensive.

    The above tip for making non-toxic lipstick was offered by beauty expert Jeannie Mai.

    Jell-O lip stain

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    If you just want a little color for the lips, try staining them with cherry or strawberry Jell-O. All you need to do is moisten a Q-tip or lip brush; then dip it in the Jell-O crystals. Apply the crystals to your lip and then rub them together.

    Buff any residue off with a clean Q-tip. Repeat the application until your lips have a natural rose color. If you want to add shine, use a salve, lip balm or vitamin E mixed with Jell-O or apply it over the stain.

    Beets

    Janice Cox, author of "Natural Beauty at Home and Natural Beauty from the Garden" has a lipstick recipe using dried beet root with sunflower oil and beeswax that will soften your mouth and soothe chapped lips.

  • Melt 1 tbsp. of sunflower oil and 1 tbsp. of beeswax in the microwave or in a double boiler to avoid burning the mixture.
  • Slowly add dried beet root for the desired color that can range from pale pink to deep red, stirring constantly.
  • Let it cool and apply it to your lips.
  • Store the finished product in clean container for the next use.
  • You can also take beet juice from the can or jar and make a lip stain like with Jell-O. Apply the juice directly to your lips, taking care to stay within the lip lines. After about 3-minutes the stain will set and you can blot the excess.

    Fruity lipstick

    Another option is to apply the juice from cherries, strawberries or raspberries. As with the other homemade non-toxic lipsticks, you can use an emollient like beeswax, lip balm or petroleum jelly to add a shine.

    The Environmental Working Group (EWG) reminds us that personal products with harmful chemicals add up. The average woman uses 12 products that contain 168 products each day. Each one is tested for safety with the assumption we are using one product a day.

    Making your own non-toxic lipstick is easy and perfect for the budget-minded woman. Another perk is that you know what you are putting on your lips- 61 percent of lipsticks tested contain lead in low amounts. The health risks, according to the FDA are minimal – but then again, why take a chance?

    Resources:
    FDA: “Lipstick and Lead: Questions and Answers
    Environmental Working Group

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